Our Values

Statement of Values, Principles, and Approaches

 

In New Digital Worlds Roopika Risam asks:

'If the archive itself is a technology of colonialism, can the creation of new archives resist reinscribing its violence?' (Roopika Risam, New Digital Worlds: Postcolonial Digital Humanities in Theory, Praxis, and Pedagogy. Northwestern University Press, 2019, 50.)

We are not sure it can. But it seems there is an ethical imperative to try. This page presents the values, principles, and approaches that inform the design, maintenance, and delivery of the Making African Connections Digital Archive. This is a live document. We encourage comments, suggestions, and reflections that can make it better.

 

  • The archive is a technology of colonialism.
  • Metadata and metadata structures organise knowledge. Both are situated in their circumstances of production.
  • Whilst controlled vocabularies support search and discovery, they also flatten complexity and impose situated knowledges.
  • Creating space for multi-vocality, uncertainty, and dispute is preferable to creating the illusion of authority from a single statement or interpretation.
  • Collecting has a history and our work adds to that history.
  • Digital photographs of artefacts are digital representations of those artefacts: they do not replace the artefacts they depict, rather they are things in their own right.
  • Copyright and licencing are legal structures produced by the Global North. There is potential for harm in unthinkingly applying these structures to digital representations of artefacts from the Global South.
  • Building a website is an intellectual act.
  • Mobile-first web design supports use in low resource environments.
  • Websites are built to die. But data organised and presented by that website must be produced in such a way that it is ready for long-term digital preservation. What we are doing in response: making our project documentation available on GitHub.
  • The products of our labour are hard to understand unless we document that labour.

 

Bibliography

 

  • Adler, Melissa. ‘Classification Along the Color Line: Excavating Racism in the Stacks’. Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies (2017).
  • Anderson, Jane, and Kim Christen. ‘“Chuck a Copyright on It”: Dilemmas of Digital Return and the Possibilities for Traditional Knowledge Licenses and Labels’. Museum Anthropology Review, 2013, 22.
  • Burton, Antoinette M. Dwelling in the Archive: Women Writing House, Home, and History in Late Colonial India. Oxford University Press, 2003.
  • Celik, Zeynep. ‘Colonialism, Orientalism and the Canon’. Art Bulletin 78:2 (1996)
  • The GO::DH Minimal Computing Working Group. (2014-) https://go-dh.github.io/mincomp/
  • Greene, Candace S. ‘Material Connections: “The Smithsonian Effect” in Anthropological Cataloguing’. Museum Anthropology 39:2 (2016).
  • Noble, Safiya Umoja. Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism. New York University Press, 2018.
  • Pavis, Mathilde, and Andrea Wallace. ‘Response to the 2018 Sarr-Savoy Report: Statement on Intellectual Property Rights and Open Access Relevant to the Digitization and Restitution of African Cultural Heritage and Associated Materials’. 2019.
  • Perez, Emma. ‘Queering the Borderlands: The Challenges of Excavating the Invisible and Unheard’. Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies 24:2 (2003).
  • Risam, Roopika. New Digital Worlds: Postcolonial Digital Humanities in Theory, Praxis, and Pedagogy. Northwestern University Press, 2019.
  • Schroeder, Caroline T. ‘Shenoute in Code: Digitizing Coptic Cultural Heritage for Collaborative Online Research and Study’, Coptica 14 (2015).
  • Stoler, Ann Laura. Along the Archival Grain: Epistemic Anxieties and Colonial Common Sense. Princeton University Press, 2009.
  • Sutherland, Tonia. ‘Archival Amnesty: In Search of Black American Transitional and Restorative Justice’. Journal of Critical Library and Information Studies 1:2 (2017).
  • Turner, Hannah. ‘Organizing Knowledge in Museums: A Review of Concepts and Concerns’. Knowledge Organisation 44:7 (2017).
  • van der Wel, Jack, et al. Homosaurus.org linked data vocabulary (2013-). http://homosaurus.org/
  • Whose Knowledge? (2016-). https://whoseknowledge.org